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The Project

Six Annual Reassessment Resource Requirements Workshops were conducted with local assessors and county directors across the state. A Review and Recommendations Workshop was then conducted to bring together ORPS and representatives of the local assessment community to discuss the findings from the initial six workshops. The plan of work is presented in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Project Plan

Figure 1. Project Plan

The six Annual Reassessment Resource Requirements Workshops were designed to identify the resources that would be required to implement the annual reassessment program. The municipalities that were invited to the local workshops were categorized according to when they had completed their last reassessment. Category 1 comprised any municipalities that had completed a reassessment in the past year or were planning to do a reassessment in 2000. Category 2 contained municipalities that conducted at least one reassessment in the past 10 years. Category 3 municipalities had not conducted a reassessment since before 1989 (see Figure 2).

Figure 2. Localities by Category Type

Figure 2. Localities by Category Type

The half-day workshops were held regionally to ensure a broad representation from New York’s diverse assessment community, including economic as well as urban/rural differences. While the local assessment community was divided geographically and according to how recently they had done a reassessment, all six workshops produced similar results.

In each workshop, CTG delivered a brief presentation on the project goals and process. CTG then asked participants, through a facilitated exercise, to identify what they would need in order to implement the program. Each response was recorded on a piece of paper and placed on a common wall for viewing. Like responses were clustered together based on the participants’ discussion. Participants were then asked, as a group, to label the clusters and then individually to identify the five most important clusters. Participants were highly engaged in the process—offering a variety of solutions for the challenges the program revealed.

In all, 162 individuals, representing local assessors, county directors, a few town supervisors, and a small group of private contractors attended. This group, representing 134 local governments, produced 472 separate responses, which were then grouped into 10-15 clusters for each session (see Table 1). The five general themes that emerged from the workshop clusters are presented below.