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Publications & Results
Online Resources (1)
Insider's Guide Cover
Wed, 01 Nov 2000
Every day, the people inside government use information to develop policies, make decisions, evaluate programs, and deliver services. The Insider's Guide to Using Information in Government draws from real agency experiences to provide a practical resource for government professionals. It covers six related topics (strategy, policy, data, costs, skills, and technology) and illustrates them with stories of state and local agency projects ranging in focus from internal knowledge sharing to statewide program evaluation.

Reports (10)
Insider's Guide Executive Briefing Cover
Every day, the people inside government use information to develop policies, make decisions, evaluate programs, and deliver services. The Insider's Guide to Using Information in Government draws from real agency experiences to provide a practical resource for government professionals. It covers six related topics (strategy, policy, data, costs, skills, and technology) and illustrates them with stories of state and local agency projects ranging in focus from internal knowledge sharing to statewide program evaluation.

The Office of the New York State Comptroller recognized the need to design and develop a next generation Central Accounting System (CAS), but first decided to define its stakeholders and conduct a stakeholder needs analysis before making any decisions. This project was conducted by CTG in partnership with a team from the Comptroller's Office as part of the Using Information in Government (UIG) program. The report summarizes the information gathered from system users in 42 state agencies, and presents a set of recommendations for next steps in developing a plan for the CAS.

In order to implement the state's new annual reassessment program, the New York State Office of Real Property Services (ORPS) set out to identify the needs of the local assessment community. This project was conducted by CTG in partnership with a team from ORPS as part of the Using Information in Government (UIG) program. This report presents a set of recommendations that were collaboratively developed by ORPS and members of the assessment community.

The Center for Technology in Government (CTG), through the Using Information in Government (UIG) program, has worked with New York State agency project teams and partners from the public, private, and academic sectors to identify benefits and strategies for integrating and using information for program planning, evaluation, and decision making. The policy, management, and technology issues identified through our work with agency teams were shared with the public in a series of seminars focused on increasing the value of information to government programs. This report summarizes the presentations given at the fourth session of the Using Information in Government Seminar Series, "Putting Information Together: Building Integrated Data Repositories," which was held on February 9, 2000 at the University at Albany/SUNY.

The Center for Technology in Government (CTG), through the Using Information in Government (UIG) Program, has worked for more than a year with New York State agency project teams and partners from the public, private, and academic sectors to identify benefits and strategies for integrating and using information for program planning, evaluation, and decision making. The policy, management, and technology issues identified through our work with the agency teams were shared with the public in a series of seminars focused on increasing the value of existing information to government programs. This report summarizes the presentations given at the third session of the Using Information in Government Seminar Series, "What Rules Govern the Use of Information?" which was held on October 5, 1999 at the University at Albany.

The Center for Technology in Government (CTG), through the Using Information in Government (UIG) program, has worked with New York State agency project teams and partners from the public, private, and academic sectors to identify benefits and strategies for integrating and using information for program planning, evaluation, and decision making. The policy, management, and technology issues identified through our work with agency teams were shared with the public in a series of seminars focused on increasing the value of information to government programs. "Information Use Tools and Skill Sets" is a summary of the second UIG Seminar, which was held in May 1999. The seminar highlighted the kind of analytical tools public managers should use to get the most out of their information for planning, evaluation, and decision making. This summary includes the presentations that focused on the new skill sets, information-related competencies, technical tools, and techniques that government program managers can use to ensure that relevant information is identified and used.

Information sharing has become a priority among organizations looking to increase productivity and improve planning. Along with this emerging reliance on information sharing comes more interest in the use of multiple data sources for enterprise level planning and decision making. This paper identifies current research and outlines practical experiences in the use of multiple data sources to support performance measurement, strategic planning, and interorganizational business processes. In addition, a series of cases are examined to illustrate the benefits, issues, methods, and results of data source integration efforts in the same organization and across multiple organizations. The objective of this research is to set the stage for the development of a methodology for integrating multiple data sources.

E-commerce, which involves linking legacy systems and their attached databases to new Web-based applications and distributed databases, is emerging as a key way for private and public sector organizations to deliver products and services to their customers and constituents. This research paper examines the technical and business ramifications of linking legacy systems, which traditionally have a low degree of connectivity, to the Web. It concludes that the high demand for e-commerce requires a more organized and structured method for developing Web-based applications.

Dealing with Data
Wed, 01 Feb 1999 >Download PDF
The Center for Technology in Government (CTG), through the Using Information in Government (UIG) program, has worked with New York State agency project teams and partners from the public, private, and academic sectors to identify benefits and strategies for integrating and using information for program planning, evaluation, and decision making. The policy, management, and technology issues identified through our work with agency teams were shared with the public in a series of seminars focused on increasing the value of information to government programs.

Dealing with Data, the first seminar in the series, was held in February 1999. It covered a variety of data issues. The report summarizes the presentations and panel discussions on data quality management, data tools and techniques, long term maintenance and preservation, and real life experiences with data issues.

It is estimated that as much as 75% of the effort spent on building a data warehouse can be attributed to back-end issues, such as readying the data and transporting it into the data warehouse (Atre, 1998). Data quality tools are used in data warehousing to ready the data and ensure that clean data populates the warehouse, thus enhancing its usability.

This research paper focuses on the data problems that are addressed by data quality tools. Specific questions of the data can elicit information that will determine which features of data quality tools are appropriate in which circumstances. The primary objective of the effort is to develop a tool to support the identification of data quality issues and the selection of tools for addressing those issues. A secondary objective is to provide information on specific tools regarding price, platform, and unique features of the tool.

Public Events (4)

Using Information in Government Seminar Series


February 1999 - February 2000

Dealing with Data
February 1999

Building Integrated Data Repositories
May 1999

What Rules Govern the Use of Information
October 1999

Putting Information Together
February 2000